Articles

Fern Ridge Dam repair--What about the birds?

by Kat Beal, Wildlife Biologist
US Army Corps of Engineers

As many Quail readers know, Fern Ridge supports an amazing variety of breeding and wintering birds. Designated as an Important Bird Area in 2002, Fern Ridge provides important habitat for migrating and wintering shorebirds and breeding habitat for species not commonly found west of the Cascades, including Black Tern, Yellow-headed Blackbird, and more recently Black-necked Stilt and Wilson's Phalarope. In the last 20 years the Corps and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife have created over 900 acres of wetland impoundments--essentially large wetlands where water levels can be managed independently from the lake's elevation. These impoundments have provided more stable habitats, and allowed managers to improve wetland composition by converting canary grass to higher quality native plants.

Maiden Peak Journal - October 8, 2001

Three years ago the Oregon Natural Resources Council invited conservationists from around the state to begin working to promote a new Oregon wilderness bill. Lane County Audubon Society joined the effort at that time by “adopting” the Maiden Peak roadless area to determine its suitability as a wilderness area. We have been exploring the area and educating the general public about its virtues ever since. I report on these activities in periodic installments of the Maiden Peak Journal.

Maiden Peak Journal - September 14, 2001

Three years ago the Oregon Natural Resources Council invited conservationists from around the state to begin working to promote a new Oregon wilderness bill. Lane County Audubon Society joined the effort at that time by “adopting” the Maiden Peak roadless area to determine its suitability as a wilderness area. We have been exploring the area and educating the general public about its virtues ever since. I report on these activities in periodic installments of the Maiden Peak Journal.

Maiden Peak Journal - August 15, 2001

Three years ago the Oregon Natural Resources Council invited conservationists from around the state to begin working to promote a new Oregon wilderness bill. Lane County Audubon Society joined the effort at that time by “adopting” the Maiden Peak roadless area to determine its suitability as a wilderness area. We have been exploring the area and educating the general public about its virtues ever since. I report on these activities in periodic installments of the Maiden Peak Journal.

Pages