News Archive

From Our Treasurer: Keep Birding Strong in Lane County—Show Your Support!

birdwatchersOne of the highlights of my summer was participating in a bird walk in New York City’s Central Park. After temporarily losing my way in the maze of lanes and paths that make up the park, I finally found the Boathouse, where Robert DeCandido, or “Birder Bob” as he is known locally, always begins his Sunday morning walks. Predictably, it was an international group, including birders from South Africa, Greenland, Turkey, China, and Oregon (me), all eager to see East Coast birds in the sanctuary that Central Park provides in the midst of the great metropolis.

We were treated to sightings of Tufted Titmouse, Eastern Kingbird, Black-and-white Warbler, Baltimore Oriole, and Northern Cardinal, along with some species more familiar to us here in the Northwest: Downy Woodpecker, Northern Flicker, and Black-capped Chickadee.

Thank you to Sara Lee Higgins, LCAS Webmaster!

Sara Lee Higgins has served as LCAS webmaster since April 2013. She brought our new webpage from a basic shell into a fully functional web presence, made online donations and membership payments possible, built in new features to provide easier access to information, and created visual improvements. Just a few adjectives to describe Sara include creative, helpful, communicative, talented, skilled troubleshooter and problem solver, attentive to detail, and self-directed. In short, she is a most excellent webmaster!
Sara plans to move out of the area and we wish her all the best. Sara, THANK YOU for all your webmaster help over the past two and a half years!

Thank you to Joyce Trawle, Audubon Adventures Coordinator!

Since May 2011, Joyce Trawle has served as Audubon Adventures Coordinator. She worked hard to grow the program, which now offers environmental education materials to over 40 classrooms in Lane County.

Joyce created a well-running program and matches up LCAS member sponsors with classrooms throughout the community. She has this year’s program in place, but needs time away for other activities. We all give Joyce a big THANK YOU for her time, commitment, and a JOB WELL DONE!

From Our President: Volunteers Drive LCAS

Volunteers are the “green energy” that drives the activities of the Lane County Audubon Society. The only way we keep our projects running is with the help of folks who have some time, talent, and initiative to help. We have a small and committed Board that steers our various projects and lends a hand when needed. The Board helps new volunteers with advice, support, and experience. We want to see everyone succeed in forwarding our mission. We care about wildlife and their habitats and we also care about people.

Audubon Adventures: Classrooms Seek Sponsors

Audubon Adventures combines the best of all worlds for participating teachers and their students for the 2015–2016 school year—the new materials are available as printed newsletters with exciting online components. This award-winning environmental educational program introduces students to the fundamental principles by which the natural world functions. This year’s topics focus on protecting Earth’s natural resources:

 

LCAS Seeks New Audubon Adventure Coordinator

Audubon Adventures is National Audubon Society’s (NAS) award-winning environmental education program. Audubon Adventures was designed by the environmental experts at NAS and boasts top-quality educational materials. Through our Adopt-a-Classroom Program, Lane County Audubon offers teachers in grades 3–5 an opportunity to participate at no cost to their schools.

LCAS is looking for someone who can link the participating teachers with the generous sponsors of this program. If you have a computer and a little time, this might be the volunteer opportunity you’ve been looking for! It takes flexibility, organization, and a sense of timing to make things work well for the teachers and sponsors.

Lane Audubon Action Alert: Comments on BLM proposal

Your input is needed on the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) plan for our public forests.

Deadline Friday, August 21. Submit comments at: 
http://www.blm.gov/or/plans/rmpswesternoregon/comments.php

The plan is for management of 2.6 million acres of federal land in western Oregon. Unfortunately, most of the proposed options increase clearcutting, reduce streamside buffers, and increase road construction.

  • The BLM should protect mature and old growth forest and work to conserve habitat that so many species depend on.
  • The BLM should not decrease streamside buffers.  Let’s keep the water cool and clean to support fish and drinking water.
  • The BLM should not allow further road construction which fragments valuable habitat and delivers sediment to streams.

 

None of the proposed alternatives provides a sound plan for ecosystem management. Please urge decision makers to present an alternative that values the forest for recreation, a multi-billion dollar industry; that protects habitat for fish, birds, and other wildlife; and that guards the ecosystem services such as clean water and carbon storage that an intact forest provides.

Thank you.

Questions?  Please contact Debbie at dschlenoff (at) msn.com

From Our President: Malheur NWR Is a Birding Paradise

We spent the first week of June in Eastern Oregon touring Malheur National Wildlife Refuge and some of the surrounding areas. This is the fourth year of drought there, and it was obvious that several key areas were lacking water. Along Highway 205 south of Burns in an area called The Narrows, no water was in sight. Two lakes, Malheur and Harney, intersect there and usually there’s water at least 15 feet deep beside the road. In years past, we have seen pelicans fishing there and both Western and Clark’s Grebes were easily seen from the road. Another location with NO water this year is in the northeast portion of the refuge along Lawen Lane, which runs into Ruh-Red Road. In previous years, we have seen Avocets feeding and Ruddy Ducks swimming happily there.

From Our President: Nature Depends on Us

Last fall, a 25-acre piece of land across the street from us was clear-cut. It had been a second-growth stand of mixed forest for over 50 years. Some of the trees were very old, so we know that in the past the forest had been only selectively cut. The logging was impossible to ignore and painful to watch and hear. Some of our neighbors had tried to buy the land to preserve the forest, but they lost the bid to the logging company.

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