News Archive

2014 Eugene Christmas Bird Count

Dick Lamster, Count Coordinator               541.343.8664              maeveanddick (at) q.com

American Robin spotted during the ECBC.
Photo: Cary Kerst

The 73rd Eugene Christmas Bird Count (ECBC) took place on Sunday, December 28, with 146 enthusiastic bird-watchers contributing their time and expertise in the field. From their sightings, combined with those of 90 Feeder Watchers, we recorded 133 species (plus one during Count Week) and 120,698 individual birds. The average numbers for the past 10 years are 134 species and 89,223 individual birds.

Local Birdman Embarks on Big Year

Noah Strycker, Eugene-Creswell native and self-proclaimed bird nerd, is devoting the entire year of 2015 to an international birding adventure. He is traveling light, carrying just a small backpack, binoculars, and a spotting scope, and will visit all seven continents with the goal of seeing 5,000 species of birds. He will eventually write a book about his adventures. You can travel vicariously with Noah by following his blog (hosted by National Audubon) at: 
http://mag.audubon.org/articles/birds/welcome-birding-without-borders.

Noah is an engaging speaker and writer; his books are must-reads for bird lovers. He brings intellect, humor, creativity, curiosity, and a deep love of nature to every project he undertakes.

Photo credit: Corey Arnold

From Our President: The Gift of Volunteers...

Each year at the Lane Audubon volunteer recognition party, as many as 80 attendees crowd the Eugene Garden Club to celebrate the accomplishments of the past year. These volunteers deserve much of the credit for Lane Audubon’s long-standing reputation as the area’s most effective grassroots advocate for birds and the protection of their habitats. Every volunteer plays a vital role in making our organization strong.

Can you volunteer time to work toward Lane Audubon’s goals? Volunteers bring the gifts of time, energy, expertise, and commitment to our organization. We’re always eager to welcome new volunteers into the fold. There are opportunities available for anyone with a little time and the inclination to help. We’ll provide the guidance, training, supplies, and anything else you need to get started.

As the new year begins, there are three specific areas that need volunteer assistance:

2014 Eugene Christmas Bird Count Set for Sunday, Dec. 28

This year marks the 73rd Eugene Christmas Bird Count (ECBC) and the 115th National Audubon Society (NAS) Christmas Bird Count. Our count this year will be on Sunday, December 28th.  Our 15-mile diameter count circle is centered in the Danebo area of Eugene and is divided into 27 areas, each with a Team Leader. The Team Leaders organize the teams, lead the groups through the area during the count day, and then submit the results to the ECBC Steering Committee.

Count Coordinator

From Our Treasurer: Birding, Technology, and the Ways We Give

Like birders everywhere, members of Lane County Audubon Society are a varied lot, especially when it comes to technology use. The proliferation of technologies that make bird-watching easier, more rewarding, and more satisfying corresponds directly to the introduction of new technologies into every aspect of our lives. Depending on how quickly we accept and use these new advances, each of us fits into one of the standard categories for technology adoption—innovators, early adopters, early majority, late majority, or laggards.

From Our President: Field Guide to the Future: Half of North America’s Birds Are at Risk from Global Warming

An alarming new report by National Audubon Society (NAS) reveals that hundreds of bird species are threatened by global warming. NAS ornithologists spent seven years studying 588 bird species and found that 314 face significant risk in a warming world. Of those, 126 species are at risk of severe declines by 2050, and a further 188 species face the same fate by 2080, with numerous extinctions possible if global warming is allowed to erase the havens birds currently occupy. To understand the links between where birds live and the climatic conditions that support them, the NAS ornithologists analyzed more than 40 years of historical North American climate data and millions of historical bird records from the U.S. Geological Survey’s North American Breeding Bird Survey and the Audubon Christmas Bird Count. Understanding those links allows scientists to project where birds are likely to be able to survive—and not survive—in the future.

From Our President: Native Fruits Attract Many Birds

Throughout the summer and fall months, I watch birds use the berry-producing trees and shrubs on our property. The fruit is a magnet for many birds and gives them a wonderful diet supplement during the breeding season and migration. Many bird species have at least a partially frugivorous diet and will eat fruit regularly.

From Our President: Oak Trees Play Important Roles

We have several large Oregon White Oaks on our property. During midsummer, as the high sun filters through the leaf canopy, the oaks create cool, shady spots where we can sit and enjoy the summer afternoons. These trees are always filled with birds. The oaks provide good nest sites, and we have seen Purple Finches, Cedar Waxwings, American Robins, and Warbling Vireos nesting in them. One year, we found a juvenile waxwing on the ground under an oak tree. It tried to get up on the fence but could not yet fly, and it was vulnerable on the ground. We put it up on a lower branch of the oak tree and the parents continued to feed it; we hope it survived. 
 

From Our President: American Robins Successfully Adapt

Each year American Robins nest on our property. The nesting pairs arrive in late February and begin singing and setting up their territories. One pair of robins nests near our gate, one pair nests across a field to the south, and another nests north of our house, all in conifers. I notice them in the early spring because they are so vocal and aggressive with each other. As trite as it sounds, the robins’ songs are a joy to hear first thing in the morning as well as late in the day. Their vocalizations, along with those of other singing birds of the summer, provide a great morning sound track.
 

52 Small Birds Now Available

A new book by Richard Weeks, 52 Small Birds, is now available! The book is a memoir of an eight-year quest to photograph and paint the 52 breeding warblers of the United States, and Richard’s beautiful artwork appears throughout the story. According to the author, “This narrative relates how the process of searching for, photographing, and painting birds enhanced and deepened my connection to the natural world.” Published in cooperation with LCAS, 52 Small Birds sells for $22 plus $2 shipping. It’s also available at LCAS monthly meetings for $20. All profits go to LCAS.
 
To order and for more information about the book and author, go to www.rweeksart.com.

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