News Archive

From Our President: Volunteers Drive LCAS

Volunteers are the “green energy” that drives the activities of the Lane County Audubon Society. The only way we keep our projects running is with the help of folks who have some time, talent, and initiative to help. We have a small and committed Board that steers our various projects and lends a hand when needed. The Board helps new volunteers with advice, support, and experience. We want to see everyone succeed in forwarding our mission. We care about wildlife and their habitats and we also care about people.

Audubon Adventures: Classrooms Seek Sponsors

Audubon Adventures combines the best of all worlds for participating teachers and their students for the 2015–2016 school year—the new materials are available as printed newsletters with exciting online components. This award-winning environmental educational program introduces students to the fundamental principles by which the natural world functions. This year’s topics focus on protecting Earth’s natural resources:

 

LCAS Seeks New Audubon Adventure Coordinator

Audubon Adventures is National Audubon Society’s (NAS) award-winning environmental education program. Audubon Adventures was designed by the environmental experts at NAS and boasts top-quality educational materials. Through our Adopt-a-Classroom Program, Lane County Audubon offers teachers in grades 3–5 an opportunity to participate at no cost to their schools.

LCAS is looking for someone who can link the participating teachers with the generous sponsors of this program. If you have a computer and a little time, this might be the volunteer opportunity you’ve been looking for! It takes flexibility, organization, and a sense of timing to make things work well for the teachers and sponsors.

Lane Audubon Action Alert: Comments on BLM proposal

Your input is needed on the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) plan for our public forests.

Deadline Friday, August 21. Submit comments at: 
http://www.blm.gov/or/plans/rmpswesternoregon/comments.php

The plan is for management of 2.6 million acres of federal land in western Oregon. Unfortunately, most of the proposed options increase clearcutting, reduce streamside buffers, and increase road construction.

  • The BLM should protect mature and old growth forest and work to conserve habitat that so many species depend on.
  • The BLM should not decrease streamside buffers.  Let’s keep the water cool and clean to support fish and drinking water.
  • The BLM should not allow further road construction which fragments valuable habitat and delivers sediment to streams.

 

None of the proposed alternatives provides a sound plan for ecosystem management. Please urge decision makers to present an alternative that values the forest for recreation, a multi-billion dollar industry; that protects habitat for fish, birds, and other wildlife; and that guards the ecosystem services such as clean water and carbon storage that an intact forest provides.

Thank you.

Questions?  Please contact Debbie at dschlenoff (at) msn.com

From Our President: Malheur NWR Is a Birding Paradise

We spent the first week of June in Eastern Oregon touring Malheur National Wildlife Refuge and some of the surrounding areas. This is the fourth year of drought there, and it was obvious that several key areas were lacking water. Along Highway 205 south of Burns in an area called The Narrows, no water was in sight. Two lakes, Malheur and Harney, intersect there and usually there’s water at least 15 feet deep beside the road. In years past, we have seen pelicans fishing there and both Western and Clark’s Grebes were easily seen from the road. Another location with NO water this year is in the northeast portion of the refuge along Lawen Lane, which runs into Ruh-Red Road. In previous years, we have seen Avocets feeding and Ruddy Ducks swimming happily there.

From Our President: Nature Depends on Us

Last fall, a 25-acre piece of land across the street from us was clear-cut. It had been a second-growth stand of mixed forest for over 50 years. Some of the trees were very old, so we know that in the past the forest had been only selectively cut. The logging was impossible to ignore and painful to watch and hear. Some of our neighbors had tried to buy the land to preserve the forest, but they lost the bid to the logging company.

Check Out the Bald Eagle Nest on Skinner Butte!

Have you been to the top of Skinner Butte to see the bald eagle nest? Yes? Great!

Haven’t seen it because you couldn’t find it?

Haven’t seen it because you didn’t know where to look?

Well, we can help:

Drive to the top of Skinner Butte, park at the overlook, and follow the paved trail, counterclockwise, to the opening in the trees. (See the arrow on the map.) Use the map to locate the nest tree.

Bring binoculars to get a good look. Bring a scope and get an even better look. Bring a good telephoto camera and a tripod and get a good photo!

 

From Our President: Lack of Rain Is Problematic for Wildlife, Plants, and People

April showers are on my wish list this year. As I write this in early March, we are in a dry spell and are well below our normal rain and snowfall amounts in western Oregon. I will perform a rain dance if it will help bring us rain. At our property, spring began in February this year. A young satsuma pear tree was in full bloom before the end of February. Pollinators were out looking for flower nectar, but most were left wandering and wondering where their food was during the untimely warm days. Bats were out looking for food earlier than I’ve seen them before too. Many of the spring birds arrived at our property early—Turkey Vultures, Tree Swallows, Violet-green Swallows, and Rufous Hummingbirds.

Thank You, Dick Weeks!

Over the past year, sales of Dick Weeks’s book, 52 Small Birds, have resulted in almost $1,000 that he has donated to LCAS!

The book is a memoir of an eight-year quest to photograph and paint the 52 breeding warblers of the United States, and Richard’s beautiful artwork appears throughout the story. According to the author, “This narrative relates how the process of searching for, photographing, and painting birds enhanced and deepened my connection to the natural world.” Published in cooperation with LCAS, 52 Small Birds sells for $22 plus $2 shipping. It’s also available at LCAS monthly meetings for $20. All profits go to LCAS.

If you have not yet seen Dick’s work, visit www.rweeksart.com

 

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