News Archive

From Our President: Where Have All My Birds Gone?

The Lane Audubon phone receives many calls from residents who ask that question. We also receive similar questions from our website contact page asking about usual backyard birds that are missing from their feeders.

Possible reasons for the lack of birds in any one location are many. We must then ask the person:

Has there been tree or brush removal nearby?
Has there been new construction in the area?
Has there been pesticide spraying?
Are there outdoor or feral cats in the area?

Announcements

Oakshire Brewery Hosts LCAS Fundraiser February 6

Lane County Audubon Society is delighted to announce it will be part of Oakshire Brewery’s Inspires community fundraising program on Wednesday, February 6. The brewery will donate $1 to LCAS for each pint of beer sold on that day. Oakshire’s Public House, 207 Madison Street, Eugene, serves beer, ciders, wines, sodas, kombucha, and a variety of food. Brewery hours are 11 a.m. to 10 p.m.

LCAS volunteers will be on hand at the brewery from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. on February 6 to welcome visitors and spread the word about LCAS’s many educational and conservation outreach programs.

From Our President: Humans and Nature Are Interdependent

Regardless of the 2018 election results (I am writing this on November 5!), I realize my message will be the same…
As Audubon members who value nature and wildlife, we need to increase our efforts to connect, inform and educate our youth about how cool and amazing nature is. We need to share our awe and reverence for the natural world around us. Share the wonder of both the complexity and simplicity of natural ecosystems. Even after generations of study by humans, we still know and understand only a small part of how underlying natural processes work to support our life systems on the earth.
We need to share that our own survival as a species depends upon how we care for the earth we inhabit. If we nurture, protect and preserve the earth’s natural places, it will be our own species we save, as well as other species with whom we coexist.
I cannot give up hope that a future generation will be able to breathe in clean air, drink clear water, and gaze out at lovely natural wonders for inspiration. Please remember, humans need nature and nature depends on us to cherish and protect it.

Children’s Book Recommendation

If you are looking for a children’s book to help engage youth in nature, check out Robert Bateman: The Boy Who Painted Nature, by Margriet Ruurs, with art by Robert Bateman.

Celebrated artist Robert Bateman is renowned internationally for bringing the natural world to life on the canvas. A naturalist and painter from his youth, Robert has for decades used his fame to shed light on environmental issues and advocate for animal welfare.

The book tells the true story of how, as a young child, Robert achieved his dream of painting the world around him and became one of Canada’s most famous artists.

Announcements, Happenings, Thankyous

Thanks to Matt Parker for Website Help--
Audubon in the Schools Update--
Mt. Pisgah Mushroom Festival Brings Out the Shroomers--and More...

On Sunday, October 28, thousands of attendees came to see the incredible mushroom display at the Mushroom Festival at Mt. Pisgah. Hundreds of them stopped by the LCAS booth to learn more about the birdlife in our area and get acquainted with the way our organization promotes the conservation of birds and their habitat through education and outreach.

From Our Treasurer: Supporting LCAS—Reasons to Give

My travels this summer took me to the Cornell Lab of Ornithology near Ithaca, New York, where I was able to bird in renowned Sapsucker Woods near the lab. I also took a behind-the-scenes tour of the research facility itself, technically known as the Imogene Powers Johnson Center for Birds and Biodiversity. The center houses classrooms, a DNA sequencing lab, and a library containing the world’s largest collection of recorded natural sounds, including the songs, sounds, and calls of more than 5,600 species of birds!

Scientists at the lab not only conduct some of the most cutting-edge research on birds and their habitats but also teach students and others about the threats that birds and other wildlife face in response to climate change and environmental destruction taking place throughout the world.

Bird Bits

Teamwork

Bird couples may work together to decrease predation at their nest. In a behavior called “coordinated misdirection,” both adults will initially fly toward their nest but one will veer off while the other goes directly to the nest. Scientists believe that nest predators are distracted by the bird in flight. This means it’s less likely that the predator will discover the nest entrance itself. The behavior has been shown in at least 28 species of passerine birds, across 5 distinct families.

Eric R. Gulson-Castillo, Harold F. Greeney, and Benjamin G. Freeman (2018) Coordinated misdirection: a probable anti-nest predation behavior widespread in Neotropical birds. The Wilson Journal of Ornithology In Press

Evaluating Expected Outcomes 

In a clever set of experiments, birds in the parrot family learned that they could exchange a token for food. Later, they were given a choice between a token or a piece of food. 

Special Volunteer Opportunity: Audubon in the Schools!

We are very excited to have a newly expanded team working on the Audubon in the Schools program now! Kathy Wilson, Barb Pope, Rose Britton, Marty Merrill, Janet Barnes, and Sue Markley have been organizing the lesson plans, specimens, and supplies while gearing up to offer AITS sessions for the 2018-2019 school year. One teacher has already contacted them and is on the schedule! We still have room for more folks to join this rewarding volunteer effort. If you have an interest in education, care about the children in our community, and want to share your enthusiasm for birds and art, please get in touch! Call Maeve at 541.485.2473, or if you are a teacher wanting to schedule a class session, email Barb Pope at aitsbirds@gmail.com.

From Our President: Volunteers Are the Life Blood of LCAS

Volunteers are the “green energy” that drives the activities of the Lane Audubon chapter. The only way we keep our projects running is with folks who have some time, talent, and initiative to help. The work done by Lane Audubon is all because of our wonderful volunteers.

We have a small and committed Board that steers our various projects and lends a hand when needed. The Board will help new volunteers with advice, support, and experience. We want to see everyone succeed in forwarding our mission. We care about wildlife and their habitats, and we also care about people.

Most of you know that we are an all-volunteer group. Some chapters have paid staff, but that is not the case with us. We do need help. Spend some time with us, come to a Board meeting, a Program meeting, and please, get involved. Lane Audubon’s work is important in the community. We advocate for environmental education and conservation programs throughout Lane County. If you have an interest in joining other Lane Audubon volunteers or have skills you would like to put to work in support of our goals, we would like to hear from you! Call 541.485.2473. Be a part of the team of Lane Audubon volunteers! Please step up to help us keep our energy and forward momentum going!

Special volunteer opportunity: Audubon in the Schools!

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