News Archive

Welcome New LCAS Board Member, Rebecca Waterman!

Rebecca has been involved with our organization as the Bird Walk coordinator since fall of 2017.  She has attended board meetings, as well as helped with bird walks and outreach events since first becoming involved. She is excited about birding and cares deeply about sharing the excitement and wonderment of birding. Thanks Rebecca, for your help!!  —Maeve

I am so excited to be the newest board member of the Lane County Audubon Society! I grew up knowing what my backyard birds were, and particularly loved American Goldfinches and Red-winged Blackbirds.

From our President: Birding Pleasures and Treasures of Belize and Guatemala

Travel for birding is a great way to learn about the global interdependence of our ecosystems. Central America hosts some of our Neotropical migratory birds during the winter months. After the previous year’s breeding season, the birds fly south for the winter and recover their strength by eating insects in the tropical jungle’s abundance of living things. Warm temperatures, water, and a wide variety of foods are available to the birds. The northern hemisphere is inhospitable to insectivorous birds during this time, but closer to the equator they can eat and prepare for their northern migration in the spring.

From Our President: Two by Two, It Begins Anew

March is when I notice that many of the birds coming to our feeder begin arriving in pairs. Earlier in the winter, the loose flocks of finches, juncos, and towhees do not show male/female pairings as they fly in for food. This month, though, I see male House Finches offering food to the females that are always nearby. Chickadees and Oregon Juncos begin engaging in territorial disputes that result in serious chases and sparring. Steller’s Jays vocalize in softer, sweeter tones as two of them hop from branch to branch in the oak tree. Chickadees flutter their wings in a begging breeding display. Actually some of the early nesting birds have already begun to build nests, such as the pair of Black-capped Chickadees that have filled one nest box with moss, and the Song Sparrows singing atop the brush pile where their nest is hidden.

I am excited about watching the skies for early spring bird migrants. Each morning I open my window and look out to see if a warm breeze has brought us any new bird arrivals. Soon Tree Swallows, Violet-green Swallows, and, hopefully, Western Bluebirds will move into the neighborhood. Their songs will fill the air. Until then, I listen to the songs of our resident birds as they begin tuning up for the breeding season.

Action Alert: Stop Industries from Getting a Free Pass to Kill Birds

Tell Congress and the Department of the Interior to uphold America’s most important bird protection law, the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA).

Lane County Audubon, as an organization, has already urged continued protection. In early February, LCAS was one of 513 organizations from all around the country to sign a letter to legislators urging them to oppose any effort that would gut the MBTA.

Add your name to the petition at: abcbirds.org/action/petition-mbta

From Our President: Maeve and Friends Nature Reads for Winter 2018

I like to ask for book recommendations from friends because we do share some of the same interests! Of course one of the main books being discussed is Noah Strycker’s Birding Without Borders: An Epic World Big Year. If you have not yet read it, make the time. You will not be sorry. In fact you will have a hard time putting it down.

Jim Maloney always offers a thoughtful list of books to watch for:

Project Puffin, by Derrick Jackson and Stephen Kress, is about the reintroduction of Atlantic Puffins to islands in the Gulf of Maine. It’s not a new book, but stories of people trying to undo a destructive past are always welcome.

Fire Birds, by Sneed B. Collard, is especially timely as we hear calls for “salvage” logging after devastating wildfires. It’s an excellent intro to the subject, detailing which avian species depend on and flourish in burns.

Looking for Seabirds, Sophie Webb’s book, is enriched by her hand-rendered illustrations. Her writing style is both friendly and factual.

From Our President: An Abundance of Gratitude

The ending of this year and beginning of a new year make me think of gratitude.

I find it important for my sanity to remember the many ways I need to be thankful for my existence, and to appreciate the many people for whom I am grateful. Obviously family and friends top my list, but many others whom I’ve met through Lane Audubon also enrich my life. 2018 will be the 18th year I’ve served as president of this group. It has become an identity, as well as a passion that fills me with purpose. I am also grateful for the many members who have either become friends or with whom we share a sense of familiarity and common ground. This interconnectedness gives us a shared space within which we can communicate and feel accepted.

Gratitude deepens and energizes relationships.

Other Lane County CBCs

Three this year! Feel free to join any or all of them. Florence, Oakridge, Cottage Grove

 

Florence CBC

Saturday, December 16

The Florence Christmas Bird Count has had a long history as a significant count area. The count circle includes both inland and coastal areas, covering very diverse habitats which attract and support a correspondingly wide-ranging species of birds. Since each area is covered by teams, participants at every level of birding experience can all be valuable contributors. Many eyes see more birds!

Morning Meeting: None. Packets will be sent out a couple weeks before the count, so people can head straight to their areas on count day.

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