News Archive

Fall 2018 Lane Audubon Program Meetings

After a summer break, our program meetings will start up again in the fall! Save these dates.

Tuesday September 25–Paul Engelmeyer, Audubon Tenmile Creek Sanctuary Manager, will talk about Land and Sea Conservation Issues and Strategies.

Tuesday October 23–Joe Moll, Executive Director of the McKenzie River Trust, will talk about river systems and the benefits of restoring them to a more natural state.

World Migratory Bird Day Celebration

On World Migratory Bird Day, Saturday, May 12, Lane County Audubon Society and Nearby Nature co-sponsored a family-friendly event at Nearby Nature’s Learnscape in Alton Baker Park.

Attendees young, old, and in between were treated to bird walks in the park, bird- and nature-related games and activities, and information about the migratory birds in our area.

From Our President: Wetlands Nourish Both Wildlife and Human Observers

My first encounter with a wetland ecosystem was in the springtime, on a vacant lot where the frogs’ chorus drew me like a magnet to the ponds in the flooded field. The hidden frogs lured me with their songs, compelling me to explore the elusive source of the sound. I was a young girl then, and I have been searching the water’s edge ever since. Many towns’ sewage ponds are their only marshy area and are frequently the local birding hot spot. The combination of water, abundant organic material, and few people lets the wildness spill into these unique areas.

Wetland habitats teem with life. Water and the underlying sediments, rich in nutrients, support diverse life forms, from bacteria and algae through every classification of organism. The productiveness of the wetland habitat provides a banquet for birds, who feast on life in the mud and water. The calm water of wetlands is a primordial soup, with frog eggs, water striders, crustaceans, marsh beetle nymphs, mayflies, and dragonflies all feeding in this richness.

Volunteers Needed for International Migratory Bird Day: Saturday, May 12, 9am-1pm

Lane County Audubon Society is again teaming up with Nearby Nature to celebrate World Migratory Bird Day (formerly International Migratory Bird Day) with the community in a big way!

The focus will be on kids’ activities, games, and bird walks throughout the morning. Bilingual (Spanish/English) activities will highlight the importance of recognizing the global lives of many of our seasonal birds, like the Osprey and Wilson’s Warbler. While living in Lane County part of their year, these birds are truly international. Many months of their lives are also spent north and south of our borders. See below (Read more) for map.

Welcome New LCAS Board Member, Rebecca Waterman!

Rebecca has been involved with our organization as the Bird Walk coordinator since fall of 2017.  She has attended board meetings, as well as helped with bird walks and outreach events since first becoming involved. She is excited about birding and cares deeply about sharing the excitement and wonderment of birding. Thanks Rebecca, for your help!!  —Maeve

I am so excited to be the newest board member of the Lane County Audubon Society! I grew up knowing what my backyard birds were, and particularly loved American Goldfinches and Red-winged Blackbirds.

From our President: Birding Pleasures and Treasures of Belize and Guatemala

Travel for birding is a great way to learn about the global interdependence of our ecosystems. Central America hosts some of our Neotropical migratory birds during the winter months. After the previous year’s breeding season, the birds fly south for the winter and recover their strength by eating insects in the tropical jungle’s abundance of living things. Warm temperatures, water, and a wide variety of foods are available to the birds. The northern hemisphere is inhospitable to insectivorous birds during this time, but closer to the equator they can eat and prepare for their northern migration in the spring.

From Our President: Two by Two, It Begins Anew

March is when I notice that many of the birds coming to our feeder begin arriving in pairs. Earlier in the winter, the loose flocks of finches, juncos, and towhees do not show male/female pairings as they fly in for food. This month, though, I see male House Finches offering food to the females that are always nearby. Chickadees and Oregon Juncos begin engaging in territorial disputes that result in serious chases and sparring. Steller’s Jays vocalize in softer, sweeter tones as two of them hop from branch to branch in the oak tree. Chickadees flutter their wings in a begging breeding display. Actually some of the early nesting birds have already begun to build nests, such as the pair of Black-capped Chickadees that have filled one nest box with moss, and the Song Sparrows singing atop the brush pile where their nest is hidden.

I am excited about watching the skies for early spring bird migrants. Each morning I open my window and look out to see if a warm breeze has brought us any new bird arrivals. Soon Tree Swallows, Violet-green Swallows, and, hopefully, Western Bluebirds will move into the neighborhood. Their songs will fill the air. Until then, I listen to the songs of our resident birds as they begin tuning up for the breeding season.

Action Alert: Stop Industries from Getting a Free Pass to Kill Birds

Tell Congress and the Department of the Interior to uphold America’s most important bird protection law, the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA).

Lane County Audubon, as an organization, has already urged continued protection. In early February, LCAS was one of 513 organizations from all around the country to sign a letter to legislators urging them to oppose any effort that would gut the MBTA.

Add your name to the petition at: abcbirds.org/action/petition-mbta

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