News Archive

Action Alert: Help Stop Raven Killing in Eastern Oregon

We are sharing an important action alert from Portland Audubon. Please consider signing. 

Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) is seeking permits to kill up to 1,500 Common Ravens in Baker County over the next three years. 

The birds will be killed using poisoned eggs, a food source for both ravens and other species. The young of the poisoned birds will be left to starve to death in their nests and non-target species will also be put at significant risk of poisoning. 

From Our President: Please Consider Opting for the Electronic Version of The Quail

How many have viewed the electronic version of The Quail newsletter? If you have not, please click on the link above.

The striking difference is the eye-catching photos and high-contrast text with different colored print. It is always easy to find. If you want to refer to it later, just go to the web site!

We encourage you to “go electronic” with your newsletter subscription for a few reasons. The environmental costs of paper and ink processes, handling and mailing, and then ultimately the excess paper waste, are all a burden on the earth. Some people cherish their paper copies of The Quail, and we understand. This is one reason we continue to offer a printed version of The Quail, for those who want to hold it in their hand. 

If, however, you do not actually find that necessary to your enjoyment of the newsletter and do not keep it for later reference, please consider sending in a request for an electronic version. Many organizations have switched to only electronic newsletters to save money. With the new reality of higher paper, ink, production, and mailing costs, we too are prompted to ask you to try out the e-Quail. You might like it even better than the print version!!! Whatever your choice, we appreciate your support.

Good Earth Show Volunteers Deserve Thanks

Thanks to all the Lane County Audubon Society members who helped make the 14th annual Good Earth Home, Garden & Living Show, held January 18-20, such a success. This year’s show turned out to be one of our best shows yet in terms of trial memberships generated, items sold, and general exposure for LCAS.

Nancy Radius, David Stone, Susanne Twight-Alexander, Margot Fetz, Janie Thomas, John Lemay, Sally O’Donnell, Dan Willis, Connie Berglund, Debbie Schlenoff, Dolly Marshall, Sara Brownmiller, Milo Mecham, and Rick Ahrens all helped staff the booth this year. Thanks to each of them.

Special thanks go to Debbie Schlenoff and her husband Rob, Maeve Sowles, Jim Maloney, Christy McMannis, Sara Brownmiller, Milo Mecham, and Nancy Radius, who helped with setup and takedown of the booth.

From Our President: Where Have All My Birds Gone?

The Lane Audubon phone receives many calls from residents who ask that question. We also receive similar questions from our website contact page asking about usual backyard birds that are missing from their feeders.

Possible reasons for the lack of birds in any one location are many. We must then ask the person:

Has there been tree or brush removal nearby?
Has there been new construction in the area?
Has there been pesticide spraying?
Are there outdoor or feral cats in the area?

Announcements

Oakshire Brewery Hosts LCAS Fundraiser February 6

Lane County Audubon Society is delighted to announce it will be part of Oakshire Brewery’s Inspires community fundraising program on Wednesday, February 6. The brewery will donate $1 to LCAS for each pint of beer sold on that day. Oakshire’s Public House, 207 Madison Street, Eugene, serves beer, ciders, wines, sodas, kombucha, and a variety of food. Brewery hours are 11 a.m. to 10 p.m.

LCAS volunteers will be on hand at the brewery from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. on February 6 to welcome visitors and spread the word about LCAS’s many educational and conservation outreach programs.

From Our President: Humans and Nature Are Interdependent

Regardless of the 2018 election results (I am writing this on November 5!), I realize my message will be the same…
As Audubon members who value nature and wildlife, we need to increase our efforts to connect, inform and educate our youth about how cool and amazing nature is. We need to share our awe and reverence for the natural world around us. Share the wonder of both the complexity and simplicity of natural ecosystems. Even after generations of study by humans, we still know and understand only a small part of how underlying natural processes work to support our life systems on the earth.
We need to share that our own survival as a species depends upon how we care for the earth we inhabit. If we nurture, protect and preserve the earth’s natural places, it will be our own species we save, as well as other species with whom we coexist.
I cannot give up hope that a future generation will be able to breathe in clean air, drink clear water, and gaze out at lovely natural wonders for inspiration. Please remember, humans need nature and nature depends on us to cherish and protect it.

Children’s Book Recommendation

If you are looking for a children’s book to help engage youth in nature, check out Robert Bateman: The Boy Who Painted Nature, by Margriet Ruurs, with art by Robert Bateman.

Celebrated artist Robert Bateman is renowned internationally for bringing the natural world to life on the canvas. A naturalist and painter from his youth, Robert has for decades used his fame to shed light on environmental issues and advocate for animal welfare.

The book tells the true story of how, as a young child, Robert achieved his dream of painting the world around him and became one of Canada’s most famous artists.

Announcements, Happenings, Thankyous

Thanks to Matt Parker for Website Help--
Audubon in the Schools Update--
Mt. Pisgah Mushroom Festival Brings Out the Shroomers--and More...

On Sunday, October 28, thousands of attendees came to see the incredible mushroom display at the Mushroom Festival at Mt. Pisgah. Hundreds of them stopped by the LCAS booth to learn more about the birdlife in our area and get acquainted with the way our organization promotes the conservation of birds and their habitat through education and outreach.

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