News Archive

From Our President: Bonney Butte Offers a Wealth of Migrant Raptor Flyovers

By September, bird migration is in full swing. We can find shorebirds and ducks arriving at Fern Ridge and other waterways. We can see the Vaux’s Swifts at Agate Hall, as well as other chimneys around the area. A little farther from home, the raptor migration can be observed from atop Bonney Butte in the Mount Hood National Forest.

Announcements

New LCAS T-shirts
Classy, freshly designed LCAS T-shirts have just become available, and you can have one for only $15. The simple but striking design features birds flying into the towering Agate Hall chimney on the UO campus. It’s similar to what we see during the spring and fall Swift Events that we host outside the actual chimney. Black with white print is the only color option. The shirts are 100 percent preshrunk cotton and made in the US. They come in sizes small, medium, large, and extra large.

They will be available at our monthly Program Meetings, and at booth events. To make other arrangements for purchasing a shirt, e-mail Ron Renchler at christyandron2@gmail.com.

Eugene Commits to Bee Friendliness
In July, the City of Eugene passed a resolution to become a Bee City USA affiliate. This official bee-friendly designation helps institutionalize our community’s commitment to sustain pollinators. The Bee City USA program endorses a set of commitments, defined in a resolution, for creating sustainable habitats for pollinators, which are vital to feeding the planet.

For details as to what this commitment entails, you can check out their website: beecityusa.org

Donated Canoe, Sold for $200
Two longtime Audubon members/volunteers donated their canoe to LCAS to sell and use the income as needed.  The money will go for purchasing hand lenses to be used in the Audubon-in-the-Schools Program.

Two Booth Volunteers Needed—(1) Setup and (2) Staffing Scheduler
Ifyou’d like to help Lane Audubon in a big way but don’t have a lot of time available, here are a couple of ways to get involved. We need a person to take over the Lane Audubon booth setup and takedown, as well as someone to coordinate the scheduling of booth staffers.

Booth setup/takedown involves delivering and erecting our portable booth, tables, and display materials at event and festival sites, and then dismantling them after the event is over. Setup and takedown require only an hour or two of your time, usually on a Saturday morning and early Sunday evening, a few times a year. If you enjoy being outdoors in the morning and doing a little light physical activity (nothing too strenuous), this could be the spot for you. Access to a larger vehicle (a van or pickup) is useful.

If you’re more indoorsy and have some basic computer and organizational skills, such as sending e-mail messages and putting together staffing schedules, you could help Lane Audubon by sending out announcements alerting our volunteers of booth staffing opportunities. After volunteers respond, you put together staffing schedules and distribute them by e-mail to volunteers. This work usually takes an hour or two and can be done in your own home a couple of weeks before booth events are scheduled.

Orientation and training for these volunteer positions will be provided. It can be rewarding to work behind the scenes to help Lane Audubon spread the word about the importance of birds and their habitats. If you’d like to learn more about either of these positions, please call Ron Renchler at 541.345.0834, or e-mail him at christyandron2@gmail.com.

From Our President: Enthusiastic Volunteers Inspire Interest in Birding

classroomSpring was Event-Full for Lane Audubon, and I have several people to thank for their outreach and education efforts over the past two months!

Between April 10th and May 18th, Barb Pope and Kathy Wilson taught 13 “Audubon in the Schools” class sessions in just eight days! They reached 366 students at five different schools in Eugene and Springfield. They were helped by our five new volunteers: Janet Barnes, Rose Britton, Rachael Friese, Marty Merrill, and Bryan Ribelin. Children and teachers alike were thrilled that we came into their classes with bird specimens and art supplies so they could learn to observe and draw the bird specimens. This is an important educational program for Lane Audubon, and we are still looking for a leader to take on the coordination of this effort. We hope to keep this great program moving into the future!

Audubon in the Schools (AITS) Needs Volunteers and a Leader

This Lane Audubon program is in high demand by grade school teachers. Teachers and their students love this program!

Our volunteer instructors and five new people brought the program to several classrooms this spring.

We hope to continue to build our volunteer pool, and more importantly, we need a leader to organize the teaching materials and set up classroom visits.

We hope to offer more in-school programs going forward.

Please help us provide the kids with these art and biology lessons!

Fall 2018 Lane Audubon Program Meetings

After a summer break, our program meetings will start up again in the fall! Save these dates.

Tuesday September 25–Paul Engelmeyer, Audubon Tenmile Creek Sanctuary Manager, will talk about Land and Sea Conservation Issues and Strategies.

Tuesday October 23–Joe Moll, Executive Director of the McKenzie River Trust, will talk about river systems and the benefits of restoring them to a more natural state.

World Migratory Bird Day Celebration

On World Migratory Bird Day, Saturday, May 12, Lane County Audubon Society and Nearby Nature co-sponsored a family-friendly event at Nearby Nature’s Learnscape in Alton Baker Park.

Attendees young, old, and in between were treated to bird walks in the park, bird- and nature-related games and activities, and information about the migratory birds in our area.

From Our President: Wetlands Nourish Both Wildlife and Human Observers

My first encounter with a wetland ecosystem was in the springtime, on a vacant lot where the frogs’ chorus drew me like a magnet to the ponds in the flooded field. The hidden frogs lured me with their songs, compelling me to explore the elusive source of the sound. I was a young girl then, and I have been searching the water’s edge ever since. Many towns’ sewage ponds are their only marshy area and are frequently the local birding hot spot. The combination of water, abundant organic material, and few people lets the wildness spill into these unique areas.

Wetland habitats teem with life. Water and the underlying sediments, rich in nutrients, support diverse life forms, from bacteria and algae through every classification of organism. The productiveness of the wetland habitat provides a banquet for birds, who feast on life in the mud and water. The calm water of wetlands is a primordial soup, with frog eggs, water striders, crustaceans, marsh beetle nymphs, mayflies, and dragonflies all feeding in this richness.

Volunteers Needed for International Migratory Bird Day: Saturday, May 12, 9am-1pm

Lane County Audubon Society is again teaming up with Nearby Nature to celebrate World Migratory Bird Day (formerly International Migratory Bird Day) with the community in a big way!

The focus will be on kids’ activities, games, and bird walks throughout the morning. Bilingual (Spanish/English) activities will highlight the importance of recognizing the global lives of many of our seasonal birds, like the Osprey and Wilson’s Warbler. While living in Lane County part of their year, these birds are truly international. Many months of their lives are also spent north and south of our borders. See below (Read more) for map.

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