News Archive

From Our President: Summer Goals Include Montane Wildflowers & Coastal Shorebirds

I have a couple of goals for mid-to-late summer this year. One is to get up to the higher mountain elevations to see the montane wildflowers on display July through August. It has been a few years since I made this trek, and I realize it is something I don’t want to miss yet again. I have memories of hiking the trail at Iron Mountain when hillside rock gardens were ablaze with Indian paintbrush interspersed with bright yellow stonecrop. And in the high meadows, enjoying a lush array of blooming flowers that changes weekly as the progression of flax, penstemon, yarrow, saxifrage, lupine, larkspur, beargrass, and others creates a stunning palette of colors. Trails at Mount Hood, Jefferson Park, and the Three Sisters areas can be bountiful with flowers, but also mosquitos.

Announcements

Audubon in the Schools: Year-end Summary Numbers, Thank You Booth Volunteers, Swift Event Recap and Thanks

Audubon in the Schools: Year-end Summary Numbers--From the 2018 fall term through the 2019 spring term, our AITS team gave 44 presentations in 19 schools to a total of 1075 students. Volunteers donated 49 hours of their time to this satisfying and exciting effort. AITS core group of volunteer instructors were: Barb Pope, Kathy Wilson, Rose Britton, and Marty Merrill. Assistants involved were: Janet Barnes, Pam Sheridan, Larue Rodgers, Sue Markley, Laurie Costa, Jessica Lamotte, and Joe Britton.

From Our President: Miraculous Avian Migrators!

Bird migration is one of the true marvels of the natural world. Some 350 species of North American breeding birds make the arduous journey north to take advantage of burgeoning insect populations, budding plants, and an abundance of nesting locations. Often they follow the same route to their summer homes, year after year. Northern summers offer longer daylight hours and more insect food to help them nest, feed, and fledge their young in a short span of time–six to eight weeks! It is a very efficient process, even though they had to make the long trip north.

Announcements

Thanks to Rose Britton
New Nature-Oriented Event Calendar for Adults
Volunteer Breeding Bird Surveyor Needed
Booth Set-Up Volunteer Needed

Thanks to Rose Britton

 Many thanks to Rose Britton for presenting an “Introduction to Birdwatching” for kids at the Springfield Public Library. Rose was assisted by LaRue Rodgers, Lauri Costa, Janet Barnes, and Rose’s niece. During her excellent presentation, she managed to keep all 61 attendees interested in learning about birds. Perhaps some new birders were inspired that day.

New Nature-Oriented Event Calendar for Adults

From Our President: All Animals Are Smart, But in Different Ways

A recent article published in The Atlantic prompted a good discussion among LCAS Board members. The article, “A Journey Into the Animal Mind,” can be seen at: tinyurl.com/y2mwpbdo 

It is only partially about crows, but includes many examples of animal consciousness and learning. It is a story of the Jain sect in India, which is an ancient religion whose highest commandment forbids violence not only against humans, but also against animals. The Jains run a Birds Hospital in Delhi, India.

Experienced Birders Needed for Breeding Bird Surveys

If you can identify most of this region’s birds by sound, the Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) would be grateful for just a couple days of your time this year, between late May and early July. There are 2 routes within about an hour’s drive of Eugene which need a volunteer: Green (west of Roseburg) and Blue River (east of Springfield). Locations of these and other “Vacant Routes” can be viewed by zooming in to the Oregon map at https://www.pwrc.usgs.gov/bbs/RouteMap/Map.cfm

Or contact me for details.

Action Alert: Help Stop Raven Killing in Eastern Oregon

We are sharing an important action alert from Portland Audubon. Please consider signing. 

Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) is seeking permits to kill up to 1,500 Common Ravens in Baker County over the next three years. 

The birds will be killed using poisoned eggs, a food source for both ravens and other species. The young of the poisoned birds will be left to starve to death in their nests and non-target species will also be put at significant risk of poisoning. 

From Our President: Please Consider Opting for the Electronic Version of The Quail

How many have viewed the electronic version of The Quail newsletter? If you have not, please click on the link above.

The striking difference is the eye-catching photos and high-contrast text with different colored print. It is always easy to find. If you want to refer to it later, just go to the web site!

We encourage you to “go electronic” with your newsletter subscription for a few reasons. The environmental costs of paper and ink processes, handling and mailing, and then ultimately the excess paper waste, are all a burden on the earth. Some people cherish their paper copies of The Quail, and we understand. This is one reason we continue to offer a printed version of The Quail, for those who want to hold it in their hand. 

If, however, you do not actually find that necessary to your enjoyment of the newsletter and do not keep it for later reference, please consider sending in a request for an electronic version. Many organizations have switched to only electronic newsletters to save money. With the new reality of higher paper, ink, production, and mailing costs, we too are prompted to ask you to try out the e-Quail. You might like it even better than the print version!!! Whatever your choice, we appreciate your support.

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