News Archive

From Our Treasurer: Support the Birds…and LCAS

By now, you may have heard the discouraging news, first published in the journal Science, about severely declining bird populations. When our members hear these reports, they often ask: How can I make a difference?

Among many possible answers (see page 2), two short ones are especially important. First, vote, and, second, support Lane County Audubon Society.

Your opportunity and duty to vote—both locally and nationally—occurs periodically, and you can show your support for birds by voting for individuals and initiatives that align with LCAS’s mission and values.

Announcements: Volunteers Needed for Audubon in the Schools and Booth Set-up, 2019 Christmas Bird Count Dec.29

Date Set for Eugene Christmas Bird Count

This year Sunday, December 29, is the date for the 2019 Eugene Christmas Bird Count (ECBC). This fun and exciting event is open to anyone interested in birds. If you are a beginning birdwatcher and want to learn more, this is a good opportunity to learn while bird watching with experienced birders. If you are a skilled birdwatcher, we could use your assistance and expertise. Whether or not you have participated in the past, we hope you will join us this year. We have space for everyone. 

From Our President: Summer to Fall Transition—Reminders of Earth’s Rhythms

Lane County enjoyed wondrous weather this summer. We had blue skies, moderate temperatures, and small amounts of rain at intervals, keeping the deciduous plants lush and green through August. Now that fall has arrived, we will see the progression of fall colors in the leaves. Fall colors in Oregon are not as famous as those of the northeast, but the stately backdrop of evergreen trees creates a contrast for the yellows and oranges of our deciduous canopy of ash, alder, oak, willow, and big-leaf maple. The understory of vine maple and poison oak adds splashes of reds.

Seeking Sponsors for Audubon Adventures 2019-2020

Audubon Adventures is back with a brand new learning kit for the 2019-2020 school year! “Sharing Our World with Birds” is the newest kit offered by Audubon Adventures. Teachers have started placing their orders and can’t wait to share the new material with students! This year’s kit includes the following three topics:

Sharing Our Shores – For many kinds of birds, beaches are places to nest and raise their young or to rest and refuel on long migratory journeys.

Looking for AITS Volunteers and Classrooms That Want AITS Visits

Audubon in the Schools (AITS) has been popular and well-received in the Lane County schools since spring of 2005 when Kris Kirkeby developed this teaching program. Last school year we visited 19 schools, and gave 44 presentations to 1085 students! We want to continue bringing this special program to grade school classrooms.

If you are a teacher and want to sign up for a class visit, please schedule with Barb Pope at aitsbirds@gmail.com

If you are interested in volunteering with this program contact Maeve Sowles at audubon@laneaudubon.org 

Our core group of seven volunteers are eager to get back into classrooms, and they would love to welcome new volunteers. Training is provided, and we typically have at least two people working together during each class session. Several requests for fall-term class sessions have already been received.

 

From Our President: Fall Brings Migrations and a New Season of LCAS Programs

September is the month for Vaux’s Swift migration! These small birds will be gathering in large flocks to roost for the night at the Agate Hall chimney on the UO campus, along with other locations. We will have our “Bon Voyage to the Swifts” gathering on Friday, September 13th, this year. Please come out to join us in watching and marveling at these interesting little birds. Their migration dates begin with sightings as early as late August and continue on into October. You can look for them any evening throughout this time span. Migration depends on the wind and the weather, food availability for the insect-eating swifts, and whether drought or fires are occurring. We never can predict exactly when they will arrive or when they will all move on to the south.

From Our President: Summer Goals Include Montane Wildflowers & Coastal Shorebirds

I have a couple of goals for mid-to-late summer this year. One is to get up to the higher mountain elevations to see the montane wildflowers on display July through August. It has been a few years since I made this trek, and I realize it is something I don’t want to miss yet again. I have memories of hiking the trail at Iron Mountain when hillside rock gardens were ablaze with Indian paintbrush interspersed with bright yellow stonecrop. And in the high meadows, enjoying a lush array of blooming flowers that changes weekly as the progression of flax, penstemon, yarrow, saxifrage, lupine, larkspur, beargrass, and others creates a stunning palette of colors. Trails at Mount Hood, Jefferson Park, and the Three Sisters areas can be bountiful with flowers, but also mosquitos.

Announcements

Audubon in the Schools: Year-end Summary Numbers, Thank You Booth Volunteers, Swift Event Recap and Thanks

Audubon in the Schools: Year-end Summary Numbers--From the 2018 fall term through the 2019 spring term, our AITS team gave 44 presentations in 19 schools to a total of 1075 students. Volunteers donated 49 hours of their time to this satisfying and exciting effort. AITS core group of volunteer instructors were: Barb Pope, Kathy Wilson, Rose Britton, and Marty Merrill. Assistants involved were: Janet Barnes, Pam Sheridan, Larue Rodgers, Sue Markley, Laurie Costa, Jessica Lamotte, and Joe Britton.

From Our President: Miraculous Avian Migrators!

Bird migration is one of the true marvels of the natural world. Some 350 species of North American breeding birds make the arduous journey north to take advantage of burgeoning insect populations, budding plants, and an abundance of nesting locations. Often they follow the same route to their summer homes, year after year. Northern summers offer longer daylight hours and more insect food to help them nest, feed, and fledge their young in a short span of time–six to eight weeks! It is a very efficient process, even though they had to make the long trip north.

Announcements

Thanks to Rose Britton
New Nature-Oriented Event Calendar for Adults
Volunteer Breeding Bird Surveyor Needed
Booth Set-Up Volunteer Needed

Thanks to Rose Britton

 Many thanks to Rose Britton for presenting an “Introduction to Birdwatching” for kids at the Springfield Public Library. Rose was assisted by LaRue Rodgers, Lauri Costa, Janet Barnes, and Rose’s niece. During her excellent presentation, she managed to keep all 61 attendees interested in learning about birds. Perhaps some new birders were inspired that day.

New Nature-Oriented Event Calendar for Adults

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